School of Staff and Command

2017 School of Staff and Command

Michigan State University School of Staff and Command is a 400-hour problem-based course that utilizes a blend of classroom facilitated learning and cutting edge distance learning technologies.

Problem-based learning (PBL) represents the next generation in law enforcement training by fostering critical thinking, and employing learning philosophies appropriate in today’s law enforcement world.

In addition to an outstanding cadre of experts in the field, faculty includes a 1:6 facilitator to learner ratio.

**APPLICATION FLYER**

Non-Michigan police agencies wishing information on bringing the School to your state or agency, should contact traincj@msu.edu at 517-355-2197.

Application Information

Thank you for your interest in applying to the Michigan State University School of Staff and Command.

Please download the document below to begin your application process:

Application CLOSED

Important Application Info

  • Application Deadline: November 17, 2017
  • Applicant Oral Board Interview Dates: December 12-14, 2017
  • Successful Applicants Notified No Later Than: December 21, 2017

For more information please contact: traincj@msu.edu.

Name Agency
Chief Doreen Olko Auburn Hills Police Department
Chief Jackie Hampton Battle Creek Police Department
Chief Brian Hill Gerrish Township Police Department
Sheriff Gene L. Wriggelsworth Ingham County Sheriff's Office
Chief Matthew Heins Jackson Police Department
Sheriff Lawrence Stelma Kent County Sheriff's Office
Chief Michael Yankowski Lansing Police Department
Executive Director Terrence Jungle Michigan Sheriffs' Association
Deputy Executive Director Hermina Kramp MCOLES
Director Edmund McGarrell Ph.D. Michigan State University - School of Criminal Justice
Director Theresa Stephens-Lock Mott C.C. Department of Public Safety
Director David Molloy Novi Department of Public Safety
Director Matt Harshberger Pittsfield Township Department of Public Safety
Chief Brian Lipe Saginaw City Police Department

Rick Arnold

School of Staff and Command Facilitator Lt. Col. Richard ArnoldLt. Col. Richard Arnold enlisted with the Michigan State Police in 1994.  As a deputy director and commander of the State Services Bureau, Lt. Colonel Arnold is responsible for managing the Biometrics and Identification Division, Forensic Science Division, Office of Highway Safety Planning, Training Division, and the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards.  Lt. Colonel Arnold received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan in 1994. He is also a graduate of the 238th Session of the FBI National Academy and the Fourth Class of Staff and Command at Michigan State University.


Contact Info: not listed

Lieutenant Chad Connelly

School of Staff and Command instructor Chad ConnellyLieutenant Chad Connelly has served with the East Lansing Police department since 1998. He graduated from Lake Superior State University in 1997 with Bachelors Degree in Science and from Central Michigan University with a Masters in Administration in 2007, and currently is pursuing a second graduate degree. Chad is a graduate of the 10th Class of Staff and Command at Michigan State University where he served as Class President.

Lt. Connelly currently serves as the K-9 Unit Supervisor and Team Leader for the Ingham Regional Special Response Team. He has served as a Patrol Sergeant and Detective Sergeant, along with various other roles for the East Lansing Police Department.

Contact Info: not listed

Lieutenant (retired) Cindy Herfert

Cynthia Herfert - OutreachCindy Herfert serves as an Outreach Academic Specialist for the Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice, providing in-service trainings to police officers and military personnel from across the United States. Cindy holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice from MSU. Cindy is a graduate of the 10th MSU School of Staff and Command class. Cindy joined the Flint Police Department in 1994 and was promoted to Sergeant in 1998. In 2014 Cindy was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant for the Patrol Division and the Traffic Division. Cindy retired from the Flint Police Department in 2015. Cindy held a variety of positions during her career, including; uniform patrol, undercover narcotics, gang investigation, homicide investigation, planning and budgeting, and community policing.

Contact Info: herfertc@msu.edu

Lieutenant Marcy Kuehn

Lieutenant Marcy KuehnMarcy holds a Bachelors Degree in Public Safety Administration from Eastern Michigan University and Masters of Science in Administration with a concentration in Leadership from Central Michigan University. She began her career in 1989 as a Police Cadet and rose through the ranks of the Port Huron Police Department.  Marcy is currently a Lieutenant in the Code Enforcement Unit and the Crisis Negotiation Supervisor.  She has served as a Patrol Sergeant, Detective, Community Service/DARE Officer, Road Patrol Officer, and a Communications Operator.  She worked as a part time instructor at Macomb Community College’s Police Academy from 1994 to 2004.  Marcy is a graduate of the 10th Class of Staff and Command at Michigan State University.

Contact Info: not listed

2018 Course Syllabus available HERE as pdf.

Michigan State University
School of Staff and Command Course Syllabus
January 1 - June 15, 2018

Team Facilitators:

Office Phone: 517-355-2197         Fax: 517-432-1787

Office Address: 655 Auditorium Road, 420 Baker Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824

Office Hours: By Appointment

Mission:

The Michigan State University School of Staff and Command is committed to building capacity of Michigan law enforcement organizations through the development of staff and command personnel within those organizations.

Goals:

Utilize teaching methods that allow students to self-discover the knowledge and skills they require in a way that builds on gifts the students already posses in a context that is relevant to them.

Create a challenging learning environment that positively impacts what the student learns and what will be transferred to other circumstances.

Facilitate students’ learning how to work safely, think critically, adopt problem-solving as a daily part of their job, and partner more readily with residents to tackle crime.

Course Description:

This Michigan focused 400-hour problem-based course is learner driven through utilization of relevant, real-life, work based problems wherein each student is responsible for his/her own learning. Students work in collaborative learning groups with a maximum of six students and one instructor/facilitator per group. They are actively engaged in problem-solving, in-depth discussions, and critical thinking activities throughout the course. Concepts and skills, once introduced, will be revisited and practiced in more and more complex problematic situations as the weeks progress.

Curriculum delivery uses a blend of classroom and cutting edge distance learning technologies. During the weeks of distance learning students are required to commit 40 hours per week which means being available between the hours of 8am and 5pm, Monday through Friday to complete a variety of course assignments that may include distance learning group meetings, field trips, and/or one-day classroom sessions.

Classroom Schedule:

  • January 1 - January 24, 2018 - Pre-Course Work - Distance Learning
  • January 29 - February 2, 2018

MSU Kellogg Biological Station Conference Center
3700 East Gull Lake Drive, Hickory Corners, MI 49060
Phone: (269) 671-2341 Fax: (269)-671-2165
http://www.kbs.msu.edu/conferencecenter/

  • February 5 - 9, 2018 – Distance Learning
  • February 26 - March 2, 2018 – Distance Learning
  • March 12 - 16, 2018 – Classroom
  • April 9 - 13, 2018 – Distance Learning
  • April 16 - 20, 2018 Classroom
  • May 7 - 11, 2018 – Distance Learning
  • May 14 - 18, 2018 – Classroom
  • June 4 - 8, 2018 – Distance Learning
  • June 11 - 15, 2018 – Classroom

Classroom Location:

Michigan State Police Training Academy
7426 North Canal Road
Lansing, MI 48913

Classroom Hours:

Classroom sessions begin Monday at 10:00 a.m. and end on Friday at 3:00 p.m. Otherwise classes begin at 8:30 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. with lunch provided.

Participants are required to commit 40 hours of course work during the weeks of distance learning. The hours are 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m., unless otherwise agreed upon by the facilitators – much of the distance learning work will be team work with all members of the team expected to participate.

Text:

  • Police PBL Blueprint for the 21st Century (Gerard Cleveland and Gregory Saville, COPS 2007). This is provided at no additional cost.
  • The Freedom Writer’s Diary – the movie. Learners are required to view the video. (Learners may also read the book by the same name but familiarity with the video and its characters is required.)
  • It’s Your Ship: Management Techniques from the Best Damn Ship in the Navy, Michael Abrashoff (Warner Books. Inc.)

Technology Requirements:

Participants must have access to a laptop (LAN connectivity is required and wireless LAN connectivity is highly recommended). You will need Internet access for the pre-course work. The laptop will be used during the first week of class.

Participants will also need a microphone and webcam by Tuesday, January 30, 2018.

Recommended software includes Adobe Acrobat Reader (11.0.07) and Microsoft Office 2007 (or higher) including Excel, Word and PowerPoint.

To ensure the best possible experience with the Desire2Learn (d2L) course management software go to the following link to find the technical requirements for the necessary operating systems (OS), other necessary installed software and browser recommendations - http://help.d2l.msu.edu/technical-requirements

Upon acceptance to the School of Staff and Command you will be given an MSU user name (VPID) and password that will give you access to MSU’s D2L system as well as other MSU distance learning resources.

Final Project:

The final paper is a 20-page maximum written mini-strategic plan or plan of action (with objectives, timelines, assigned responsibility for completion, outputs and performance measures) for meeting one organizational goal (i.e. a state or condition your agency seeks to achieve) identified by the learner. The organizational goal must address a historical problem in your agency and relate to furthering your agency’s mission.

Corrections managers: the final paper is a 20-page maximum written Staffing Analysis (with objectives, timelines, concepts and methodology, outputs and performance measures) for meeting organizational goals as it relates to staffing and budgeting.

A ten-minute oral presentation summarizing the plan of action for meeting that goal is also required.

Grading:

If the Pre-Course work is not completed by the Wednesday before the first day of class, the learner will be dropped from the course and will have to re-apply for admittance at a future school.

This course is PASS/FAIL with evaluation rubrics used to evaluate the learner’s level of achievement re: the identified behavior-based learning objectives. Thirteen rubrics will be utilized with 100 points per rubric. To continue beyond the third week of class, learners must have earned a minimum of 320 (80%) of the possible 400 points. To successfully complete the course learners must have earned a minimum of 1,040 (80%) of the possible 1,300 points.

Upon successful completion of the 400-hour course, those who enrolled with Michigan State University prior to taking the course for either 3 or 6 academic credits will have earned a 3.0 grade at either the graduate or undergraduate level. Additional course work may be required as per the off-campus course instructor to raise the grade point beyond the 3.0.

Course Schedule:

January 1 – 24, 2018 - Pre-Course Work. Prior to attending the first day of class students are
required to complete an eight-hour self-paced distance learning course of instruction. This precourse
work insures that all students arrive for classroom instruction with a minimum baseline
understanding of his/her responsibility for and accountability to learning.

  • Introduction to Bloom’s Taxonomy and Critical Thinking Skills
  • Introduction to evaluation rubrics
  • Introduction to Emotional Intelligence
  • An analysis of the Problem Based Learning process
  • Completion of an on-line DiSC Personal Profile survey

January 29 - February 2, 2018 – Attendance is mandatory from 10 a.m. Monday morning
through 3pm Friday afternoon at the MSU Kellogg Biological Station Conference Center. Meals
and lodging are provided. Lodging is single room within a doubles suite that shares one bath.

  • Engage in reflective learning via blogs, personal goal setting and one-on-one meetings with team facilitators throughout the course.
  • Examine participant’s behavioral style based on feedback from DiSC Personality Profile survey
  • Examine different behavioral styles and the environment that is required for maximum productivity and harmony in the work organization
  • Discuss how law enforcement is part of a larger criminal justice system and how changes to one part impacts the other parts
  • Create a blog
  • Practice using various features of Microsoft Word
  • Create a PowerPoint presentation
  • Examine participant’s learning style and the learning styles of others
  • Assess participant’s emotional intelligence and how those skills impact participant’s productivity and harmony in the workplace as well as personally
  • Identify the participant’s conflict behavior style using the Thomas-Kilmann conflict mode instrument
  • Create a successful, well-functioning learning team
  • Discuss the pros and cons of evaluation rubrics – as they will be used throughout this course
  • Discuss shifting paradigms within the field of law enforcement
  • Examine via case study the pitfalls of and how to avoid “Group Think”
  • Practice using the problem-based learning 5-step process – this will continue throughout the course
  • Practice incorporating multiple learning styles into oral presentations
  • Practice oral presentation skills
  • Identify and examine current and emerging technologies - this will continue throughout the course
  • Practice peer teaching – this will continue throughout the course
  • Create professional and personal growth goals for this course and track progress throughout the course.

February 5 - 9, 2018 – Distance learning.

  • Practice using PBL
  • Examine Calls for Service
  • Access and use distance learning technologies and resources of the MSU Distance Learning Library
  • Examine various strategies for marketing a police agency’s value to its community
  • Practice use of on-line meeting technology, Zoom
  • Examine participant’s multiple intelligences
  • Understanding social media utilization for the police organization

February 26 – March 2, 2018 – Distance Learning

  • Explore organizational vision, mission, and core values
  • Compare what an agency says it is doing with what it is actually doing
  • Develop organizational goals and objectives
  • Trend analysis: personnel and resources research and data collection
  • Practice written presentation skill building

March 12 -16, 2018 – Classroom

  • Practice oral presentation skill building
  • Tour the Michigan Intelligence Operations Center at MSP Hq.
  • Assess current strategies for recruiting, training and retaining the millennial employee
  • Recognize the “evidence” based distinction in best practices models found in various police related fields and its importance to requesting federal funds (grants, etc.)
  • Examine various evidence-based data driven approaches to crime and traffic safety
  • Practice identifying a match between employee needs and the appropriate leadership style via case scenario (Situational Leadership)
  • Design and lead a book dialogue on the reading It’s Your Ship: Management Techniques from the Best Damn Ship in the Navy
  • Conduct a “crucial conversation”
  • Practice conducting meetings, creating an agenda, keeping time and recording
    business conducted

April 9 – 13, 2018 – Distance Learning

  •   Write a federal grant requesting funds for use by participant’s agency, including budget, budget narrative, work-plan, SF 424, and assurances
  • Practice writing clearly and concisely

April 16 - 20, 2018 – Classroom

  • Practice oral presentation skill building
  • Compare and contrast traditional budget process with zero-based budgeting process
  • Discuss government financing and the municipal budget process
  • Examine excerpts from Gettysburg and discuss re: EI and leadership
  • Write a basic incident command plan that identifies roles and responsibilities, for managing a given multi-jurisdictional, high profile case
  • Draft a communication plan around a given multi-jurisdictional, high profile case
  • Practice participation in a press conference

May 7 - 11, 2018 – Distance Learning

  • Develop a zero-based budget with justification for requested expenditures
  • Practice written presentation skills

May 14 - 18, 2018 – Classroom

  • Oral presentation skill building
  • Review sexual harassment laws and individual and organizational response
  • Evaluate participant agency’s officer suicide prevention policies and practices
  • Using case scenarios, evaluate various FOI requests for police records or information
  • Examine employee discipline and the rights of employees in the internal investigatory process
  • Create a police resource allocation spreadsheet model for application at participant’s agency
  • Practice scheduling optimal police patrol on shifts of various length (8, 10 or 12 hours)
  • Examine recent high profile use of force incidents from across the country and the role of community partnership to mitigate backlash
  • Write a rule, policy and procedure
  • Analyze and lead group discussion on five leadership practices common to successful leaders (Kouzes and Posner)
  • Examine the concept of procedural justice.

June 4-8, 2018 – Distance Learning

  • Identify a historical problem that relates to the learner’s police agency mission
  • Develop an organization goal to address the identified learner agency’s historical problem, with objectives, timelines and assignment of responsibility
  • Create a comprehensive written mini-strategic plan or plan of action on how the identified problem will be resolved
  • Corrections – Conduct a staffing analysis of the jail
    • Develop a plan that will explain the concepts/methodology of analysis
    • Create a comprehensive written plan or plan of action for addressing the jail setting, assignment plans, and evaluation of the prepared plan.

June 11-15, 2018 – Classroom

  • Practice oral presentation skills on audiences with varying learning styles
  • Examine the concept of Strategic Planning
  • Discuss the Michigan Sheriffs Association Line of Duty Death SMMART teams
  • Draft an outline for a citizen complaint process
  • Outline a strategy for managing change within a law enforcement agency
  • Design and lead group discussion around the video Freedom Writers
  • Discuss the Future of the Criminal Justice Field via panel presentation by members of Michigan’s law enforcement leadership and related disciplines
  • Graduation.

Class Attendance:

Participants are paid employees while attending class and completing distance learning course work. Rules of attendance and conduct are the same in the classroom as during a regular work assignment. Attendance information will be maintained. Absences and tardiness will be reported to the learner’s agency at the time they occur.

Conduct and Dress:

Only proper business casual (slacks and shirts with collars) attire shall be worn by participants of the School of Staff and Command program during classroom sessions. Blue jeans, tank tops, shorts, sandals and jogging suits will not be worn in the classroom. Firearms – Be guided by your departmental policy.

MISSION:

  • The Michigan State University School of Staff and Command is committed to building capacity of law enforcement organizations through the development of staff and command personnel within those organizations.

GOALS:

  • Utilize teaching methods that allow students to self-discover the knowledge and skills they require in a way that builds on gifts the students already posses in a context that is relevant to them.
  • Create a challenging learning environment that positively impacts what the student learns and what will be transferred to other circumstances.
  • Facilitate students’ learning how to work safely, think critically, adopt problem-solving as a daily part of their job, and partner more readily with residents to tackle crime.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

  • Develop personal and professional goals, collect baseline data relative to those goals, identify gaps between where the individual is and where he/she wants to be, evaluate progress toward those goals, and continuously monitor evaluate, and revise those goals. Reflective learning journals, one-on-one evaluation meetings with a facilitator, and evaluation rubrics will be used to demonstrate achievement.
  • Evaluate new and evolving technology and its applicability to current and emerging challenges to public safety.
  • Create and function effectively within a team that demonstrates an understanding of the interdependencies between people and how to act as a teammate with others regardless of whether there is a formal or informal structure and/or whether working with internal or external organizational partners.
  • Research information, analyze and evaluate the data, and recognize trends and gaps that have the potential of impacting how a police organization conducts business in a community.
  • Construct recommendations for proposed plans of action that are developed using a problem solving process that includes an understanding of the identified problem and an evaluation/ assessment as to the effectiveness of the response. Recommendations presented will include background information, an assessment/conclusion, and the recommendation(s).
  • Produce and practice oral presentations that incorporate multiple styles of learning, demonstrate an understanding of public speaking skills, effective use of audio-visual aids, and a variety of types of oral presentations (facilitation, poster session, classroom instruction, conduct meetings, power point presentations, oral reports, etc.).
  • Assemble various types of written communication documents that are grammatically correct, with no spelling errors, properly formatted, and clearly and concisely written.
  • Write a grant that includes project goals and objectives, statement of the problem, project design and implementation, capabilities/competencies, budget, outcomes, and performance measures.
  • Produce a written comprehensive gap analysis report and make an oral presentation on the findings of that report as the final course problem. The report and presentation will include recommendations on what the learner’s agency needs to be doing now to meet what data and trend analysis are projecting for the next 5-10 years for his/her agency.

MINIMUM TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS

Participants are strongly encouraged, but not required, to bring a laptop computer/iPad/tablet/etc. for ease in accessing the many resources that will be available online. Participants will also need a microphone and webcam. Recommended browsers and computers supported by MSU's on-line learning management software Desire 2 Learn (D2L) include the following:

Note the following:

  • Ensure that your browser has JavaScript and Cookies enabled.
  • For desktop systems, you must have Adobe Flash Player 10.1 or greater.

Desktop Support

Browser Supported Browser Version(s)
Internet Explorer 10, 11
Firefox Latest
Chrome Latest
Safari 5.1, 6.0

Tablet and Mobile Support

Device Operating System Browser Supported Browser Version(s)
Android Android 4 Android Latest
Apple iOS 6, 7, 8 Safari Latest
Microsoft Surface Windows 8 Internet Explorer 11
Blackberry (mobile only) Blackberry 7, 10 Blackberry Latest

Office Suite:
Microsoft Office (recommended)
Sun OpenOffice

Adobe Acrobat:
Adobe Acrobat Reader

instructors