Professor Steve Chermak and doctoral student Brent Klein among co-authors of article on threats of violent Islamist and far-right extremism

Photo of Brent KleinPhoto of Steve ChermakThe Conversation has published an article written by Professor Steve Chermak and doctoral student Brent Klein, among other authors.

In Threats of violent Islamist and far-right extremism: What does the research say? the authors argue that the empirical data they collected and analyzed over the last ten years indicate that both types of extremism pose a significant threat, and it could be dangerous to focus on one type to the exclusion of the other.

The Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice fund the Extremist Crime Database to collect data on ideologically motivated crimes in the United States. As noted by the authors, “These data reveal that far-right extremists tend to be more active in committing homicides, yet Islamist extremists tend to be more deadly.” Results of the authors’ analyses are published in peer-reviewed journals and on the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) website.

Other contributing authors are William Parkin (Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice, Seattle University), Jeff Gruenewald (Assistant Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis), and Joshua Freilich (Professor of Criminal Justice, City University of New York).

Read the entire article HERE.